Taxation of liquidating

To the extent that a distribution is made from the corporation’s earnings and profits, it is taxed to the shareholder as a dividend.[1] The portion of the distribution that is not considered a dividend is applied first to reduce the shareholder’s basis in the corporation’s stock.[2] Any remaining portion is treated as gain from the sale or exchange of property (capital gain).[3] Important Note: If a shareholder assumes a liability or takes property subject to a liability, the amount of the distribution is reduced by the amount of the liability.[4] Special rules also apply at the corporate level.[5] Special rules apply to distributions to a shareholder in exchange for the shareholder’s stock (redemptions).Instead of being treated as dividends, redemptions are treated as a sale or exchange of the stock by the shareholder.[6] The distinction can be important when the long-term capital gains rates (which apply to redemptions) are higher than the tax rates on dividends.The Internal Revenue Code uses four tests to make this distinction: To prevent gamesmanship among related parties, Congress has added another layer of rules that must be analyzed to determine if a distribution is a redemption.These attribution rules provide that shares owned by a shareholder’s parents, children, and grandchildren (but not siblings) are considered to be owned by the shareholder.[11] Similarly, shares held by corporations, trusts, and partnerships are deemed to be owned by their shareholders beneficiaries, and partners, and vice versa.[12] As a result, shares held by these family members and entities are considered to be owned by the shareholder for purposes of determining whether the distribution qualifies as a redemption.A partner’s initial basis in his partnership interest depends on how the partner acquired the interest.If the partner acquired the interest in exchange for a contribution to the partnership, his basis generally equals the amount of money and the partner’s adjusted basis in any property contributed to the partnership.[2] If the property is subject to indebtedness at the time of the contribution, the partner’s basis is reduced by the portion of the debt that is assumed by the other partners.[3] If the partner acquired his interest in exchange for services, his basis equals the value of services provided.[4] If the partner purchased his partnership interest, his basis equals his cost.[5] The partner’s initial basis is adjusted to give effect to transactions affecting the partnership.The partner’s basis in his partnership interest in increased by: These basis adjustments depend in large part on the allocation of partnership income, gains, losses, deductions, and credit among the partners.

Because the tax consequences of distributions depend on the shareholder’s basis, it is important to keep up with changes in the shareholder’s basis over time.Unlike a permanent termination of business activity, a temporary termination does not give rise to any taxation.Example: a business operator who is forced to temporarily stop his business activity during a period of medical convalescence.Because the income of S corporations is taxed to the owners when the income is earned, a mechanism is needed to ensure that the shareholder is not taxed again when the earnings are distributed.This is done through a system of rules that track and adjust the shareholder’s stock basis.Adjustment: the net assets after the close of the balance sheet of the last financial year are reduced by the amount of profits distributed.The amount of profits distributed is later reintegrated in the calculation of the liquidation proceeds and thereby ensures that all profits distributed after the close of the balance sheet are taxed accordingly.This discussion of the tax consequences of contributions to partnerships will also apply to limited liability companies unless the limited liability company has elected to be taxed as a corporation.As with S corporations, the tax consequences of a distribution to a partner are heavily dependent on the partner’s basis in his partnership interest.A shareholder’s basis in his S corporation stock is increased by the share of the S corporation income that is passed through to the shareholder.This effectively gives the shareholder a credit to apply against the earned income when it is ultimately distributed to the shareholder, ensuring that the income is only taxed once.

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  1. In reality, though, the issue of online cheating is more complex—especially when it concerns sexual activities involving actual interaction with other individuals.